Books

    Christian Faith and Pluralism

    By David Hickman

    There are many questions for thoughtful Christians in a society such as Australia to explore: What are the challenges of living in a pluralist society? On what grounds can we trust the...

    Publisher
    Ark House Press

    ISBN
    9780645322057

    Publication Date
    December 1, 2021

    US Price
    $10.99

    Page Count
    254

    About the book

    There are many questions for thoughtful Christians in a society such as Australia to explore:

    What are the challenges of living in a pluralist society?

    On what grounds can we trust the accounts of the life, death and resurrection of Jesus?

    Does Christian discipleship make the world a better place?

    What are the implications of Christian faith for social justice, the kind of leaders we support, for presenting beliefs in schools, for involvement in sport?

    How should Christians regard the use of evidence, the problem of hidden agendas, the significance of self-esteem?

    David Hickman explores such questions, drawing on personal experience and on the work of some significant writers such as Peter Berger, CS Lewis, John Stott, Hubert Butterfield and Richard Niebuhr, as well as Australian writers such as John Dickson, Tim Costello, Naomi Reed and Brian Hill. He adds his own insights from research and teaching in the areas of Sociology and History, as well as reading of Christian apologetics and biographies of Christians, and relevant Scripture.  His perspective can be broadly classed as evangelical Christian, while acknowledging the variety of views among evangelical Christians about some of the matters discussed.

    Reviews

    About the book

    There are many questions for thoughtful Christians in a society such as Australia to explore:

    What are the challenges of living in a pluralist society?

    On what grounds can we trust the accounts of the life, death and resurrection of Jesus?

    Does Christian discipleship make the world a better place?

    What are the implications of Christian faith for social justice, the kind of leaders we support, for presenting beliefs in schools, for involvement in sport?

    How should Christians regard the use of evidence, the problem of hidden agendas, the significance of self-esteem?

    David Hickman explores such questions, drawing on personal experience and on the work of some significant writers such as Peter Berger, CS Lewis, John Stott, Hubert Butterfield and Richard Niebuhr, as well as Australian writers such as John Dickson, Tim Costello, Naomi Reed and Brian Hill. He adds his own insights from research and teaching in the areas of Sociology and History, as well as reading of Christian apologetics and biographies of Christians, and relevant Scripture.  His perspective can be broadly classed as evangelical Christian, while acknowledging the variety of views among evangelical Christians about some of the matters discussed.

    Reviews

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